People in Housing Need report

September 15 2020
People In Need Graphic

Futures Housing Group is supporting the National Housing Federation’s #HomesAtTheHeart campaign, which is asking the government to make building more social homes a priority in the UK’s post-covid economic recovery plan.

Today, the National Housing Federation (NHF) published its annual People in Housing Need report, which analyses the number of people in housing need today. A lack of social housing means that nearly 8 million people in England have some form of housing need, and a total of 3.8 million are on waiting lists for social housing. On top of this, some people have been waiting for a social home for almost two decades and may never be housed.

The Covid-19 outbreak will only intensify the problems people in housing need will face, with unemployment on the rise, and the eviction ban due to end shortly. As more people fall into financial difficulty due to the pandemic, it’s also likely the numbers of people in housing need will rise, adding to the already significant number of people on social housing waiting lists.

The NHF is therefore calling for once-in-a-generation investment in social housing to help boost the economic recovery of the country post-Covid. More social housing will not only provide more safe, secure and affordable homes for people in housing need, but also create jobs, upskill the UK’s workforce, and push forward the delivery of energy efficient homes.

As an ambitious and growing not-for-profit social housing provider, we want to build even more safe, secure and affordable homes for local people. We already provide more than 10,000 homes across the East Midlands, but we want to do more to tackle the shortage. Over the last three years, we’ve built nearly 1,000 new homes and as we launch our new corporate plan for 2020-23 we’re aiming even higher.

The report can be found here and you can support the campaign by visiting #HomesAtTheHeart 

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